4 Challenges of Aging Alone

There’s a growing segment of people who are aging without the help of their adult children (either because they don’t have children or because their children live far away). Read on to learn more about the challenges this group faces.

People are living longer than ever before in history. People are having less children. And those children often live out of town or in other states. Because of all these factors, 1 in 4 Americans over the age of 65 are at risk of becoming “elder orphans.”

Many don’t like this term. “I’ve lived just fine on my own nearly all my life!” However, it is a quick and clear way to describe a growing number of people who are getting older without the immediate support of close family. And it is a HUGE challenge – one our firm is seeing more and more often.

4 Challenges of Aging Alone

It used to be that a will was an adequate estate plan for most people, but a will only works after a person’s death. A will cannot help with the challenges that present themselves when a person is in their 70’s and 80’s. And if that person does not have children, or has children halfway across the country, then the challenges of the last two decades of life can make things even harder.

So what are 4 important things to consider if you find yourself in this situation?

1. Who’s gonna be in charge?

Of course, you would like the answer to be yourself, but what happens if you have a stroke, start to experience the signs of dementia or develop cancer? When the time comes (and it will come for the vast majority of people), who will pay your bills for you? Who will help get you to doctor visits or treatments? Who will help you get groceries or cook? Read about choosing good helpers here.

2. Who will even know if you need help?

Oftentimes, we don’t recognize the need for help in our own lives. More often than not, at our firm, it is the adult children who notice that their parents need help. It is nearly impossible to notice a slow decline in your own life without someone else’s perspective.

3. What if you get help from all the wrong places?

Sadly, there are more ways to scam seniors than ever before. Dishonest caregivers have always been able to steal money, change the will, etc. but now there are mail order scams, and tech scams on iPads or via email. It is really hard to know who to trust (read about 7 Types of Helpers to Watch Out For here), which brings us to the next challenge…

4. What if you reject good advice because you don’t know who to trust?

While it is really hard to know who to trust, there are still some really good, honest people out there who are passionate about helping seniors. We work with these types of advisors everyday. They are out there, but if you’re on your own, how will you know if you can trust them?

Aging is not something any of us wants to think about, but by thinking and planning ahead, you can save yourself a lot of grief, stress, dignity and money.

If you are facing the prospect of aging alone and are concerned that you don’t have an adequate plan in place, don’t hesitate to give us a call at 217-726-9200. We are always happy to help in anyway that we can!

checkbook

The Checkbook Test: Can your executor or trustee pass it?

Good “helpers” are essential to an effective plan. Could the people you’ve chosen as executor, trustee, power of attorney, or guardian pass this simple test?

Every Estate Plan Needs a Good Helper

We talk about good “helpers” a lot, and that’s because they are vitally important to an effective estate plan. Helpers are the people who will carry out your plan when the time comes. They can be known by different names depending on which document names them as a helper. Some helpers are trustees for trusts, some are executors for wills, some are power of attorney for health or finances, and some helpers are guardians for minor children. No matter the title, their job is essentially the same – to make good choices and to act for you when you cannot do it for yourself. (Read more about choosing good helpers here.)

The Checkbook Test

There is a very simple way to gauge whether you have chosen the right person to be one of your “helpers.”

Imagine the person you have chosen (or are considering choosing) as your executor or trustee. Now, imagine giving them your checkbook and letting them pay your bills for a couple months. How does that make you feel? Do you feel nervous? Anxious? If so, you may want to reconsider who you’ve chosen as a helper. 

Read about 7 Types of Helpers to Watch Out For here.

So, how can Edwards Group help?

If you’ve been around Edwards Group for any amount of time, we hope that you’ve seen how we approach estate planning differently. One of the things we do differently is by counseling our clients as they make the hard decisions that have to be made when creating an estate plan. We have experience that most people don’t. We do estate planning all day every day, and we’ve done it for over a decade now. We can help guide our clients through these hard choices.

If you need help choosing “helpers” for your plan, call us at 217-726-9200 and ask for a copy of our paper newsletter on choosing helpers. We’ll be more than happy to mail you a copy. You can get immediate access to this great resource here.

Download our resource on choosing good helpers HERE.

5 Problems Caused by VA Financial Planners

There are financial planners out there who hold themselves as VA planners offering “free” VA benefit advice, but their “free” advice often comes with a hidden price.

Non-attorney Planning Tactics Can Backfire

David was in Atlanta a few months ago at the Academy of VA Pension Planners. It’s one of many professional organizations that David belongs to in order to make sure the firm serves our clients better than anyone else. The AVAPP solely focuses on helping Veterans, and their families, get the benefits they earned in service to their country.

Did you know that only 28% of Veterans who qualify use their benefits? And as one of the only law firms in Central Illinois to be accredited by the VA, we want to make sure that everyone who has served our country gets to age with dignity and receive the best care possible.

There are some financial planners who hold themselves out as VA planners offering “free” VA benefit advice. Some are very knowledgeable, but there are some problems with the “free” advice that you need to watch out for.

5 Tactics that Non-attorney VA Planners Use

1. Transferring the house to the kids

Maximizing VA benefits sometimes means rearranging assets. One mistake we have seen is transferring a house to the children. While this will help work for VA benefits (allowing the house to be sold without messing up benefits), there are problems with this strategy. One problem is when the house is later sold, the kids will pay capital gains taxes that could have been avoided. By putting the house in a Veterans Asset Protection Trust, we could get the VA benefits but also avoid the capital gains tax later.

2. IRAs and taxes

Because the VA has asset limits, sometimes IRA accounts must be moved to qualify for benefits. Without proper tax planning, some families incur a huge tax bill that could have been avoided. Instead, working with an experienced attorney can help you consider all the planning options and the tax impact.

3. Annuities with long surrender charges

Often, the “free” VA advice comes with a recommendation to tie up assets in an annuity with long surrender periods. Is anything really “free” in this world? Unfortunately, some families do not realize that the VA financial planner they are relying on is ultimately trying to sell them costly and expensive annuities that tie up their assets far into the future. (This is how the financial planner makes his living.) Instead, a Veterans Asset Protection Trust can help you protect and arrange assets, while allowing your family free access to the investments held in the trust. You need to consider all of the legal and financial tools to see which is best. Unfortunately, non-attorneys often ignore legal tools, such as trusts, even though they may be the best option to help qualify for benefits.

4. Transferring assets to children

Some non-attorney planners transfer assets to the kids so the client can get VA benefits. So, what is the problem with that? If the client needs more care down the road, the funds may have already been spent by the kids. Plus, the gift could keep them from qualifying for Medicaid. (And 70% of nursing home residents use Medicaid to pay for their care.) Transfers of assets must consider both the current goal (VA benefits) and future needs (such as Medicaid benefits to pay for nursing care). By working with an attorney experienced in both VA and Medicaid planning, you can have a flexible plan that considers future health needs.

5. Messing up wishes

Another strategy that non-attorney planners use that can backfire is to transfer the parent’s money to one child in order to qualify for VA benefits. However, that strategy then changes the entire estate plan because one child legally ends up with all the money (unless they voluntarily share it with their siblings, and sadly, we’re experienced enough to know this happens much less often than you think). Instead, once again, the Veterans Asset Protection Trust is a great tool to preserve your wishes after death, but still help you qualify for VA benefits now.

Call 217-726-9200 if you have any questions at all. We will be more than happy to talk with you.

robin williams; death; wills; trusts

A Lesson from Robin Williams: Having “The Conversation”

One way in which you can minimize fighting amongst your family after you’re gone is by having “The Conversation” before you go…

Does Your Family Have Trust Issues Like Robin Williams?

After his death in 2014, it appeared that Robin Williams did everything right when it came to estate planning. The bulk of his wealth was transferred through well-thought-out (and private) trusts that distributed his belongings to his three children while also providing for his current wife, so she could stay in the house they shared. And yet, his third wife and his three children still got involved in a court case with each other. So what happened? And what can we learn from this situation?

Effective Estate Planning Anticipates Emotions Will Run High

The first thing people should know is that all bets are off when someone dies. In the extremely emotional  environment of grief and loss, even the best families experience some stress and disagreement. It’s just hard to avoid. Every estate planning attorney could fill a book with unbelievable real life stories about this very thing.

Effective estate planning attorneys work hard to mitigate this risk and prevent these issues from tearing families apart. And that’s where “The Conversation” and the “Special Stuff List” come in. Over the next two weeks, we’ll look at two important actions you can take to minimize fighting in your family.

“The Conversation”

Just like the birds and the bees talk you once had with your kids when they were younger, this next conversation can bring up almost as much anxiety. Many times it’s “easier” to start a conversation about inheritance and estate planning during family gatherings or holiday get-togethers. I know. I know. That sounds like a real downer of a conversation for a family event, but let me assure you, it will be a lot less unpleasant than what your family will experience after you’re gone if you DON’T have “The Conversation” with them.

Here are 5 tips for talking about inheritance:

1. Share your own reasons or motives for bringing up the issue. Then try to clearly convey what values are really important to you. What’s important to accomplish with your assets after your death? What does fair mean to you? What does it look like? What items do you think have special meaning? What stories about those items need to be written down and shared with your family?

2. Ask “what if” questions to find out how your family feels about certain scenarios. “What if Mom had to go in a nursing home and I was already gone? Would you want to keep the house? What would you do with the stuff in the house?” Or “what if Mom and I downsized. What would you want us to keep?”

3. Clearly convey choices you’ve already made, like who is in charge of making decisions after you’re gone (or incapacitated). For example, if your will says that the children should share your estate 50/50, then one child may understand that to mean keeping the house and sharing it. The other child may see it as an opportunity to sell the house and get some money. Bam. Now you have a big fight and your children never speak to each other again. (This is a TRUE story.) It is vitally important to talk to your kids about how you want things done before you’re gone (and then make sure to tie it down legally, as well.)

4. Look for natural opportunities to talk about the issue. Sometimes the death of a neighbor or a friend can provide better timing for this conversation. Celebrity deaths like Robin Williams can also present good times to bring up the topic, especially if their estate is presenting problems you would like to avoid.

5. Listen. Remember that listening is an important part of communication and any conversation. Take time to listen to your family’s perspective and opinion throughout the course of “The Conversation.”

Having “The Conversation,” along with detailed and effective legal planning will go a long way in avoiding the problems that Robin Williams’ family is now having. Read more tips on having “The Conversation” here.

In a future blog post we’ll talk about creating your “Special Stuff List.” This special list further clarifies your wishes and intentions with regards to certain special pieces of property. (Like your paperweight collection or the antique shotguns you inherited from your grandfather.)

As always, if you have any questions, please feel free to call us at 217-726-9200. We will be more than happy to help you in any way possible.

[Photo by Jacobo Hoyos Zea via Flickr, licensed under Creative Commons.]

3 Myths About Choosing a Helper for Your Plan

We’ve talked previously about what a “helper” is and why it’s so important to not only choose one, but choose a good one. Whether it’s as a trustee, executor, power of attorney or guardian, it’s very important that you choose someone who is up to the task.

Here are 3 myths about choosing a helper that you should avoid:

1. “I need to name my oldest child.”

While it is historically conventional to name your oldest child as a “helper” in estate planning, we challenge that convention when it’s not the best choice. If your oldest child is not your most responsible child, or if your oldest child has extenuating circumstances in their life (like a special needs child) that would prevent them from carrying out the duties of a helper, then it is perfectly acceptable to choose a child other than your firstborn.

2. “I should name all of my kids as co-executors.”

In an effort to be “fair,” many people think that naming their kids as co-executors is a good idea. David generally does not recommend this option. Read here to find out why.

3. “My kids will figure things out without me.”

This may seem like the easiest option, but it is generally the worst option for your children. The stress and aftermath of a parent’s death is easily one of the hardest times in life. By leaving all of the hard decisions to your kids, you’re heaping an unbelievable amount of extra stress and pressure on them. Good families are destroyed by bad estate planning. We see it everyday.

So what factors should you consider when choosing a helper? Read this article, Every Estate Plan Needs a Good Helper to find out. Also, check out “12 Duties of a Helper” to learn more about what exactly executors, trustees, guardians and powers of attorney do. And if you need help making this decision, that’s part of our unique approach to planning – we walk our clients through the process, helping them think of every detail. Give us a call today at 217-726-9200 or attend one of our upcoming workshops.

7 Types of “Helpers” You Need to Watch Out For

As you age, or as you complete your estate plan, you’ll need to name different kinds of “helpers” who will carry out your plan when the time comes. These helpers are officially known by different names depending on the job they’re given. They can be known as trustee, executor, power of attorney or guardian, but no matter what their legal name is, their job is to act for you when you can’t act for yourself. This can happen in cases of stroke or other debilitating illnesses as you age, or after a death. It’s very important you choose the right person.

Our founding attorney, David Edwards, has been in the estate planning field for almost two decades now. When you’re that experienced, you start to notice trends. Here are some kinds of helpers David has seen over the years – helpers you may want to avoid if you have any of these “types” in your family:

1. The Do-Nothing – Mom died 2 years ago, but her house is still sitting empty, crumbling. Tax bills and utilities eat up the estate, while the rest of the family waits. He says, “I’ll get to it soon.”

2. The Messy One – In grade school, this person couldn’t find her homework. As a teenager? Clothes piled a foot deep in her bedroom. As an adult? She’s often late to appointments (if she remembers them at all). And finances? Her checkbook has never been balanced, and she gets monthly overdraft notices. Now she’s been named a trustee…

3. The Fighter – His competitive spirit was great while playing sports in high school. But it has not worked out so well with his family or his marriage. Being right is more important than anything else. And now, as a trustee, he gets to decide what’s “right.” There’s no talking to him about it, because it’s his job, and it’s “none of your business how I do it.”

4. The Romantic – “I’m just not ready to sell grandpa’s car or fishing cabin yet.” This trustee lets her emotions get in the way of the job – which is to sell or distribute trust assets. And it’s not just the car and cabin – what about personal property? How do you sort out or (gasp!) even throw stuff away? “It’s just too hard. I can’t do it yet.”

5. The Bossy One – The parents named Junior and Sissy as co-trustees, wanting both of them to have a say and to work together. But big brother is used to being in charge and taking over. He won’t even talk to his sister about what is going on. “If you don’t like it, go get a lawyer… I don’t care if we spend the entire estate on legal fees!” Bossy brother pushes and threatens, leading the more reasonable sister to let him have his way. “It’s just not worth it to try to fight.”

6. The Stress Ball – She’s always running here and there, never any time to sit and talk about the estate. IF you get her on the phone she says, “Sorry. Can’t talk now. Can I call you back?” She means to do her job as trustee, but she can’t find time for the things in her own life, much less this added duty. The family isn’t sure what to do – take legal action or just wait a little longer.

7. The Broke One – His ends never seem to meet, and he’s always in financial crisis. Bill collectors call all the time. Now he’s named as a trustee and gets a checkbook showing a nice balance. It’s easy to rationalize – “I’ll just take some of my inheritance early, to get past this crisis.” But then he needs a little more and a little more. As time passes, the family wonders what has happened to their parents’ money.

So, what types of people make good helpers? Here are some things to consider in naming “helpers.”

We understand that this can be a very daunting task. As always, we are here to help you create an effective estate plan. You don’t have to do it alone. We’ll guide you along every step of the way. Give us a call at 217-726-9200 to get started, or attend a FREE workshop.

Call 217-726-9200 to RSVP for an upcoming workshop today or to schedule an Initial Meeting.

Estate Planning is Like… Birthday Cake

Much like your favorite birthday cake flavor, everyone likes different things when it comes to estate planning.

Well, as of March 5, I’m another year older! And to celebrate I got to have the best birthday cake in the world — spice cake with chocolate icing! What kind of cake do you request on your birthday?

Dave Bday cake 2015

In our family, everyone seems to have their own favorite. For my wife Michelle, it’s spice cake with white icing. (And she is forever trying to talk me into changing the icing on my birthday cake!) 8-year-old Bailey asks for white cake with white icing, and I’m not sure 4-year-old Cole has settled on a choice yet. My dad likes yellow cake with chocolate icing. My mom? Carrot cake with cream cheese icing. My brother, Jay, for decades requested turtle cake. (Which Michelle and I found out firsthand, does not turn out well if the recipe is copied down wrong!) Jay’s wife, Beth, likes white cake with white frosting just like Bailey.

Everyone’s got an opinion. Of course, the rest of them are all wrong! Spice cake with chocolate icing is clearly the best choice for a birthday cake.

And we haven’t even gotten to the ice cream! Some want chocolate. Some want vanilla. Others like cookie dough or cookies ‘n’ cream. We’ll save that for another blog post!

Everyone likes different things. The same choice does not work for everyone, even if they’re from the same family.

With your estate plan, you need a plan that fits your family – not a fill-in-the-blank form that doesn’t reflect your unique values, wishes, or family challenges.

And within your plan each child or loved one may have a different challenge or need that should be addressed. Don’t treat them all the same. Some want white icing. Others need chocolate. A good plan will take into account their personality, financial wisdom, and the unique situation of each heir.

If you need a more personalized (and therefore, more effective plan), our free workshop, Intro to Edwards Group: Wills and Trusts Orientation is a great way to get started. Call us at 217-726-9200 to RSVP for the next workshop. Find out our upcoming workshop dates here. Learn more about the workshop and what you’ll learn by attending, here.

IRA

The Lifecycle of an IRA: 4 Stages

There are 4 stages in the lifecycle of your IRA, and each one gets progressively more complicated.

The last stage is “What happens when I’m gone?”

Here is what you need to know about each stage leading up to the last:

Before age 59 1/2, you are usually paying into the IRA. But if you try to take anything out, you pay the taxes plus a 10% penalty.

After 59 1/2, you can take funds from your IRA if you like, and pay the tax. But you can also just leave it in and let it grow

After you turn 70 1/2, then you must start taking funds out. How much you take out is based on your age. The term for this is the “Required Minimum Distribution” or RMD. This requires that you take out a certain percentage every year, based on your age. The IRS has a table that says how much you have to take out. To calculate your first RMD, take the value of your IRA at the beginning of the year and divide by 27.4. The second year you divide by 26.5 and so on, based on the table. The good news is that even at age 100, the IRS table still estimates that you have over 6 years to live!

So, what’s the next stage of your IRA?

After you die. At that point, the IRA will take one of two forms:

1) If you leave it to your spouse, then the spouse can just take it and add it to their IRA.

2) If you leave it to your kids or others, then they can’t put it in their IRA. Instead, they will keep it separate as an inherited IRA. At that point, they are required to begin taking those minimum distributions (RMD’s) based on their life expectancy. It doesn’t matter what age your child is, they have to begin taking money out annually after your death. For instance, if you leave your IRA to a child who is 47-years-old, then she has to take out at least 1/37th of the IRA the first year, 1/36th the next year, 1/35th the next, and so on.

With IRA planning, the key is how we handle this after-death stage. There are quite a few planning tricks that can help, plus plenty of traps for the unwary. We will address some of those traps in next week’s post.

Take Action Now: Update Your Beneficiary Designations

It is vitally important that you review all your beneficiary designations (life insurance, 401(k)s, etc.) every 2 years, or sooner in cases of births, deaths, marriages, divorce, job changes or retirement. Download our beneficiary designation form here. Read on to see real court cases that show why it is so crucial.

We talk about beneficiaries A LOT around here, and the following court cases will show some of the reasons why, but first, let’s review what a beneficiary is and why it’s so important.

There are a few financial planning tools that are not passed down in wills. Things like life insurance and 401(k)s are passed down to whomever you write on the beneficiary designation form when you sign up for them. And sadly, many people NEVER change those names ever again despite the changes in their life circumstances. There are a significant number of people who take the time to care for their loved ones by taking out life insurance policies, but then don’t pay attention to who really owns it or who the beneficiary is. The tragic consequences of this oversight, impact those they love most.

Life is not a fairytale. Things do not automatically work out for the best. The law is the law, and therefore, will not be swayed by what seems reasonable for your family. These two federal cases illustrate that:

In Hearing v. Minnesota Life Insurance Company, a single father named his sister as beneficiary of his life insurance policy so the sister could take care of the daughter. He intended to change the beneficiary to his daughter once she turned 18. But he never got around to it. Sadly, the father died and the sister claimed the life insurance. Despite a handwritten note stating that he wanted his daughter to be the new beneficiary, the court found that the only thing that mattered was the name on the beneficiary designation. The sister, not the daughter, got the $100,000 pay out.

Again, in The Lincoln National Life Insurance Company v. Ruybal case, we have another “sister” situation. A single dad named his sister beneficiary because she was supposed to take care of the kids. Upon death, the decedent’s sister, his executor, and the two daughters all claimed the life insurance. The court ruled in favor of the sister, noting that, “Anyone attacking the right of a named beneficiary to receive the proceeds of an insurance policy has the burden of proving that the beneficiary is not entitled thereto.” In other words, the sister was on the form – plain and simple. Would it have been more fair for the estate or the daughters to get the money from the policy? Probably. But it is not the duty of the courts to do the reasonable thing. It is their duty to uphold and interpret the law. It is your duty to keep up to date with your beneficiary designations.

As you can see in each of these real-live cases, the court ordered payment to the named beneficiary, even to the detriment of the children of the deceased.  The clear message from the courts in these decisions is that the named beneficiary of a life insurance policy will get the death proceeds regardless of what other competing claims exist, or what one’s sense of fairness seems to dictate.

This means the burden is yours to keep up with your beneficiary designations. It is vitally important to make sure they are up to date. At the very least, you should review your beneficiary designations every 2 years. But in the case of the following life events, you should review your beneficiary designations right away:

  • Family events such as births, deaths, marriages and divorces all should trigger a review of ALL beneficiary designations.
  • Work events such as changes in business, change of job or retirement ALL should trigger reviews.
  • External events such as significant tax changes or other legal changes should also trigger a review.

Some mistakes are just not fixable. Please, double check your beneficiary designations if you have not done so recently, and use this form to help get the job done effectively. Edwards Group clients can rest easy because we help make sure assets are set up properly (and stay that way through our Dynasty Membership program).

If you’re not a client and are concerned that your plan may not be as effective as it could be, we encourage you to check out an upcoming Aging With Confidence workshop where you will learn about effective planning at every stage of life. As always, if you have any questions, we’d love to chat with you! Just give us a call at 217-726-9200.

will

3 Reasons the Majority of People Don’t Have a Will

It’s vital that you do not take the ostrich approach to estate planning.

A recent survey released by Rocket Lawyer found that 51% of Americans ages 55-64 don’t have wills! That’s a lot of people with their head stuck in the sand hoping things will just work out when they die. Based on what we see everyday here at Edwards Group, that is a COSTLY assumption to make.

Dying without a will costs your loved ones time, money, and extra stress during the already stressful grieving process. A will isn’t about your death. It’s about taking care of the ones you love.

The Top 3 Reasons for Not Having a Will

So, what reasons did people give for not having a will? The study found that:

  • 57% just haven’t gotten around to it
  • 22% felt it wasn’t urgent
  • 17% didn’t think they needed a will

Attorney David Edwards says this all the time – the greatest threat to estate planning (and protecting your family) is procrastination.

Here is what “not getting around to it” will cost when it comes to planning:

Loss of money – Lack of good planning can cost you money – more attorneys’ fees later, more taxes, more money being paid to a nursing home. By planning ahead, you can protect what you’ve worked so hard for.

Loss of family – Lack of effective estate planning tears families apart. Poor planning leaves families with wounds that never heal. Sadly, I see this all the time. Bad estate planning breaks up good families.

Increased stress for loved ones – A lack of proper planning can cause countless headaches and heartaches for your grieving family when it comes to dying without a will. Extra paperwork; long, drawn out court cases; and lost time from work piled on top of your loved ones’ grieving and busy regular life.

And for the 17% who don’t think they need a will, I hear that all the time, too. “I don’t need an estate plan. I don’t have an estate!” But that’s not true. If you own a house, are married or divorced, and you have children, then you need a will. Virtually everyone can benefit from having a personalized estate plan. Without one, the state of Illinois will decide what happens to your house, bank accounts, cars, etc. when you die. And trust me, the state of Illinois doesn’t know you or your family, so they may not make the same decisions you would make.

So what can you do? At Edwards Group we’ve worked hard over the years to make the process as simple as possible. Here are a few easy next steps if you need a will:

1. Give us a call at 217-726-9200. Tarina loves helping people and answering their questions. In fact, she was a client before she ever started working at Edwards Group, so she has a unique perspective that many find helpful.

2. Schedule an initial meeting. If you know you’re ready and want to stop putting it off any longer, just give us a call and schedule your Initial Meeting. At this meeting (which usually lasts about 45 minutes) you’ll review your concerns and goals with an attorney who will help you understand the unique risks your family faces. By the end of the meeting you’ll understand your planning options, how much it will cost and if Edwards Group is the right firm for you. Clients find this meeting to be very valuable in helping them understand their options.

Remember, the biggest threat to your assets and your family is procrastination. Please take action now. Don’t put it off any longer. There is too much at stake. Call us at 217-726-9200 to get started.