Help for approaching end of life issues with forethought and dignity.

Would You Know How to Stop Elder Abuse?

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day was observed recently, and we shared some helpful information in our email newsletter. (Sign up for our educational newsletter here.) Elder abuse is a complex issue that can encompass physical and emotional abuse, neglect, and exploitation. It’s estimated that 5 million older Americans are victims every year. And while that is far too many, it is estimated that for every 1 case of reported abuse, there are 23 more out there that go unreported!

The focus of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day this year was financial exploitation, which can take many forms. In developed countries like ours, abuse often involves theft, forgery, misuse of property and power of attorney, as well as denying access to funds.

Sadly, we see these things here in the office far too often. That’s why a few years ago we created a series on elder fraud. In this three part series, we explore common scams to watch out for, PLUS seven questions that can stop elder fraud in its tracks. Click on the links below to learn more so you can protect yourself or your loved ones:

It will take a community of loved ones, neighbors, professional advisors, case workers, etc. to continue to fight this shameful trend of taking advantage of seniors. Speaking up and educating people are important steps in the battle.

12 Duties of a Helper: What Do Executors, Trustees, Guardians and Powers of Attorney Really Do?

Every estate plan needs a good helper(s). Choosing those helpers can be tough. Your trustee, guardian, power of attorney or executor will be responsible for making decisions when you become disabled (like from a stroke or dementia) or pass away. But what exactly are they responsible for?

Your helper(s) will take on many financial, legal and managerial responsibilities on your behalf.

Here are 12 specific duties of a helper:

  1. Sell assets like cars, house or property
  2. Make tax decisions and file tax returns
  3. Pay bills
  4. File claim forms on IRAs, annuities and life insurance
  5. Follow the instructions of your Trust
  6. Make decisions about your care (at home, assisted living or nursing home)
  7. Manage investments
  8. Meet with attorneys and accountants
  9. Sign legal documents
  10. Negotiate sales of any property
  11. Referee disputes between other family memebers
  12. Tell beneficiaries “no” when they ask for money

It is especially important to choose a helper that you trust to manage your finances, as this will become a majority of their responsibility. A great way to decide if you have chosen the best helper is to look at how they currently manage their own life. How does it make you feel to envision your helper stepping in and managing your life right now? If it makes you nervous, perhaps it is best to reconsider whom you have chosen.

We are here to help you through the difficult decision-making process of choosing a trustee, executor, power of attorney or guardian. We guide people through this process all the time helping them know what they should consider when making this very important decision.

We have been through this with many families before, whereas the average family has only been involved in this process once, maybe twice. Let our experience guide you to peace of mind when it comes to choosing the right helper for your estate plan.

Learn more by reading “7 Types of Helpers to Watch Out For” here. Or check out “3 Myths About Choosing a Helper for Your Plan” to find out some common misconceptions about who you should choose.

death parent

Case Study: When a Young Mother Suddenly Dies

The Brock’s were just an average young family in the 1980’s. The father, Robert, had been to Vietnam and back a decade earlier. The mother, Margaret, stayed at home with their two young boys, James and Steven. The family lived in a modest ranch house in middle America. But one day their normal life unexpectedly came to an end when the complications of a routine surgery left Margaret in a coma. Her sons were only 8 and 6 at the time.

The Death of a Loved One is Never Normal

Without health insurance or life insurance, Robert faced a very difficult situation as his wife lay in a coma. Margaret didn’t have any written health directives. Only Robert knew that Margaret didn’t want to be kept alive through artificial measures. After less than a week, Robert made the agonizing decision to remove Margaret from life support. Margaret’s parents and sister disagreed with how quickly he made the decision, which made a tragic situation even worse.

Margaret’s parents continued to be a part of their grandsons’ lives. They tried to make peace with her husband’s decision. But Margaret’s sister never forgave Robert. Margaret’s sister also lumped James and Steven in with her anger towards Robert. Instead of being a link to their missing mother and helpful part of the grieving process, she severed the relationship. The boys had not only lost a mother. They had now lost an aunt, an uncle and their cousins as well. Potentially powerful relationships in the healing process were gone.

Having already made the most difficult decision of his life, Robert Brock continued to face the harsh reality of life after his wife’s death. The bills from his wife’s surgery, hospital stay, and death piled up. However, Robert couldn’t sell the house to relieve some of that burden. Without a will, part of the house now belonged to the two boys and could not be sold until the boys were of legal age. Robert was forced to take on extra accounting work at night for a local small business. The boys would go with him after school and be expected to occupy themselves while their father worked an extra 5 nights a week.

A Cautionary Tale: What They Wish Could Be Different

Following the example set by his father, the youngest son, James, never dwelt on what happened or what could have been. He simply continued on with life. Now an adult himself, sometimes James wishes his father had handled things differently. For example, his father never told the boys the exact date of their mother’s death. James is still unsure of the date two decades later. For the most part, though, Robert and his boys chose not to let this tragic event define them in a negative way.

There are also times when James misses having motherly advice, but what he misses the most are the stories that define a lifetime. The story of his birth, stories from childhood, and stories from his mother’s life — all of those died with his mother (and when his aunt walked out of their life). Other than a few photographs, he has nothing left of her. His father’s way of dealing with the overwhelming sadness of the situation was to get rid of everything and sweep it under the rug. While Robert may have thought this was best for him and his boys, it left a big hole in their life.

What Good Is a Plan During a Tragedy?

An estate plan cannot erase the grief for the family left behind when a loved one dies, but it can ease the transition and facilitate healing. Here are some tools that families can use to help make things easier during the devastating and sudden loss of a loved one:

  1. Legal documents clearly stating end of life issues can ease the burden on a spouse who is faced with an agonizing decision like the one above. These documents also could have given other family members peace of mind knowing that their sister/daughter’s wishes were being carried out. In the end, this could have preserved important family relationships for those left behind in the distressing wake of loss.
  2. Preserving memories or special items that lay a foundation for adulthood can mean a lot to the children left behind, but preserving the stories behind those items through letters or audio recordings would have been priceless.
  3. Life insurance could have eased the daily financial stress of losing a spouse and raising children alone.

The death of a spouse or parent is never easy, but there are many things that can make sudden and devastating events, like the one above, a little easier for those left to live life without a very special loved one.

will

The Difference Between a Will, a Living Will and a Living Trust

A recent survey on estate planning found that 74% of those surveyed thought estate planning was a confusing topic. That’s no surprise considering estate planning has a language all its own. Today, we’ll sort out the difference between a Will, a Living Will and a Living Trust. Three separate estate planning tools with similar names, but different roles to play in your planning.

Last Will & Testament

This is what people commonly refer to as a “Will.” It is the most popular estate planning tool. This legal document is used to determine where assets go and who is in charge (the executor) after you die. Until you die, your Will and your executor do not have any legal authority. Wills often must go through the time and expense of probate court.

Living Will

A Living Will states your end of life wishes, such as when to “pull the plug.” This document reduces stress and confusion for your loved ones. It gives guidance to the person serving as your healthcare power of attorney. This is the person who ultimately decides when to stop treatment and let you go if it becomes necessary.

Living Trust

A Living Trust does a lot of what a Will does, but it does it more efficiently. It is kept private and avoids probate court. A Living Trust also states your wishes after death, but also includes instructions if you become disabled. The Trustee is in charge of the trust. Usually, you are the Trustee while you’re healthy, but then a successor takes over if you become disabled (by a stroke, Alzheimer’s, etc.) or when you pass away. (Read more here about choosing good helpers for your plan.)

Helping educate people and demystify estate planning is one of our highest priorities because effective plans can only be created when clients and attorneys work together. You bring your knowledge of your family and it’s unique circumstances. We bring our knowledge of estate planning and the law. Together we create effective plans that bring peace of mind and protection for those people and things you care about. (Read more about that here.)

To continue learning more about the unique language of estate planning, click here to read “What’s the Difference Between a DNR and a POA?” To learn more about Wills and Trusts, check out the dates for our upcoming workshop, “Wills & Trusts: How to Get Started”.

david edwards estate plan

Secrets: 5 Things Your Adult Children Need to Know About Your Estate Plan

Parenting often involves keeping secrets, especially when the kids are little — remember all the secrecy surrounding Christmas or birthdays?

Back when my daughter was 4 years old my wife and I kept a big secret from her. For her 5th birthday we surprised her with a trip to Disney World in conjunction with an estate planning conference! (She was excited about the first, while I was pretty excited about the second.) It was hard to keep the secret at times, but it sure was a fun surprise when we pulled it off.

Estate Plan Secrets

Secrets can be fun. But where estate planning is concerned, they most definitely are not. Sometimes it’s hard to know what our kids may or may not know about our plan. Walt Disney’s daughter was once asked by kids at her school what it was like to be his daughter: She came home that night indignant, telling her dad, “You never told me you were Walt Disney!” Sometimes things that seem obvious to us might not be so obvious to our kids.

5 Things Your Kids Need to Know About Your Estate Plan

What do your kids know or not know about your estate plan? Here’s a quick checklist to consider:

  1. Burial — Do your kids know whether you want to be cremated or buried? If you want to be buried, where do you want to be buried? Have you already purchased a cemetery lot?
  2. Who to Call — Do your kids know who your attorney is or how to get a hold of him/her? Can he help tie up loose ends or was he only used to fill out forms and make them official during planning?
  3. Assets — Do your kids and/or family know what your assets are? If you suddenly have a stroke or heart attack can they easily find that information?
  4. End of Life — Are they clear about your wishes for ending treatment and “pulling the plug?” Do they know how you feel about organ donation?
  5. Your Plan — Do they know where to find your will, trust and/or powers of attorney? (And if they’re in your safe deposit box or home lock box, can they get in? Do they have the key or the combination?) Will your kids be surprised by your plan? (How you divided assets or whether you gave to charity…) Unfulfilled expectations can mean conflict between your kids or lifelong heartache for a child who misreads a plan as being a symbol of how the parent felt about them.

5 Tips to Make Sure There are No Secrets About Your Estate Plan

  1. Talk. Have conversations with your kids about aging, death and what will happen. There are good conversation starter resources at EngageWithGrace and The Conversation Project. You can also read our post on the subject HERE. The holidays, when families gather together, are a good time to get these conversations started.
  2. Find an experienced attorney. Work with an attorney who keeps your plan up to date through a membership program or a maintenance plan. That way, even if you don’t want to share all of your financial information with your kids now, the attorney will have it to provide them with later. Read about our program HERE.
  3. Don’t assume. Recognizing if your kids will know what to do or how to do it once you are gone can be really hard. Tell them what you expect now. Things like which advisor to rely on or “take care of your little sister” can go a long way.
  4. No surprises. Give your kids the overview of your plan, so they know what to expect. News such as, “I’m going to leave your brother the farm,” is better with an explanation from you now. Your attorney can help with this, providing as much or as little detail as you want.
  5. Don’t just fill out a form. Include purpose statements in your will or trust. Tell why you did what you did, or explain that “it is my intent” that the plan work a certain way.

Estate planning works much more smoothly when there are no secrets or surprises. Save your family a lot of money and heartache by doing a little work now. Read about how to avoid an estate battle after you’re gone HERE.

hospice

5 Misconceptions About Hospice

Many people are afraid of hospice. This fear comes from a misunderstanding of the services hospice can provide. Last week we talked about the basics of hospice and why it is one the most positive ways to approach the end of life. This week we tackle some of the big misconceptions about hospice.

5 Misconceptions About Hospice

1) Doesn’t saying “yes” to hospice mean you’re “giving up”? No, hospice does not require that you give up hope. Yet, many people see it that way. Hospice is a way to deal with the transition of death on your own terms, generally in your own home. Most people arrive at hospice too late, making the process harder, not easier, on their family.
2) Won’t my doctor know when it’s time and recommend hospice? Not necessarily. Doctors are trained to heal. They don’t want to “give up” either. Because of that, it’s important to understand what hospice is, and how it can help, if you or a loved one has a terminal illness or advanced disease. Again, most people get hospice care too late, which robs them and their family of quality time together in their last days/months.
3) Will hospice provide 24/7 continuous care? No, you need to have a dedicated caregiver. In the beginning, you will receive more visits from hospice staff, then it will drop off a bit. Towards the end, the visits will pick up again, but hospice is not around-the-clock nursing care. If you or your loved one needs that, and your family cannot arrange for a dedicated caregiver, then you need to consider other options.
4) Do I have to use my hospital’s hospice program? No, you have a choice about what hospice to use.​ You do not have to use the hospital’s service. Again, it’s important to plan ahead if at all possible. Some hospices are better than others. This is not a decision you should make without doing some research.
5) Aren’t all hospices non-profit organizations derived from a religious affiliation?75% of hospices in the US are now for-profit organizations, according to a Washington Post article from 2014This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it does mean consumers have to be careful when choosing which agency to use. The hospice industry has much less oversight than nursing homes or other healthcare providers, which places the burden of oversight on families who are already in a very stressful situation.

All in All, Hospice Is a Very Good Thing

Most people, if given the choice, would rather die peacefully at home instead of experiencing a series of acute hospital stays or ER visits for the last few months of their life. Yet that’s what many people inadvertently do because they don’t understand hospice.

Hospice gives patients and families great comfort in a time of great stress. It shouldn’t be done at the last minute when it is too late to provide meaningful moments between the patient and family. Good hospice care can help facilitate the tension of such a big transition while making more meaningful moments possible. Because of the spiritual care and social workers, hospice is an amazing support system for those dealing with the hardest, and ultimate, transition in life.

As always, if you have any questions or concerns about estate planning, elder law, Medicaid planning, long-term care planning, Veterans benefits or end-of-life documents, please give us a call at 217-726-9200. We are more than happy to speak with you!

 

What You Need to Know About Hospice

At Edwards Group we believe that education is foundational to navigating the issues of aging with as little stress as possible. And with all the misinformation out there about hospice, we thought it would be good to do an article on the topic.

Elisa Cottrell, a former hospital chaplain who handles our marketing and communications, sat down with Kathleen Sgro, founder of Alterna-Care Home Health (and former oncology nurse), and Joseph Sgro, Chief Development Officer for Alterna-Care, to talk about hospice. What is it? Who needs it? And why is it such a powerfully positive experience when done well?

What is hospice?

Hospice is a type of comprehensive and compassionate care for someone facing an advanced or terminal illness. Hospice care addresses the physical, emotional, social and spiritual needs of the patient, while also helping the family with their emotional and spiritual needs. Hospices employ nurses, social workers and chaplains to meet these needs. Primarily, hospice is a home health benefit. This means that patients get to stay in the comfort and familiarity of their own home while they receive hospice services. The nurses, chaplains and social workers come to you and your family.

Who needs hospice?

In addition, if your disease is causing great pain, hospice nurses are experts in managing pain. They also have a much better outcome than nurses who have not been trained in hospice care.

Generally, if you have been given a prognosis of 6 months to live, then you will qualify for hospice. This DOES NOT mean that you are giving up or that you will get “kicked out” after 6 months. You can receive hospice services for as long as you are declining. It is a coordinated effort between all of your medical team to determine if you still need hospice. Sometimes people get better and get discharged. While you receive hospice though, you may not go to the ER. Hospice is about quality of life and making life as good as it can be while you have an advanced disease.

Why should you use hospice?

In addition to effective pain management, there are other very good reasons why hospice needs to be viewed as a good thing and not something negative.

Going in and out of the hospital trying to get acute care, which is only going to cause more stress and pain in the short run, is not a good way to spend the end of life. Most people, if given the choice, would rather die peacefully at home instead of experiencing a series of acute hospital stays or ER visits for the last few months of their life. Yet, that’s what many people inadvertently do because they don’t understand hospice.

Hospice gives patients and families great comfort in a time of great stress. It shouldn’t be done at the last minute when it is too late to provide meaningful moments between the patient and family. During our conversation, Joe Sgro said he “routinely argues that oftentimes hospice is more for the family than the patient.” It gives everybody the time and space to do what needs to be done relationally at the end of life, and that is so very powerful. Frequently, the patient will be ready to stop “fighting” via active treatments of their disease, but the family isn’t ready for that. Hospice can help facilitate that tension and make more meaningful moments possible. Because of the spiritual care and the social workers, hospice is an amazing support system for those dealing with the hardest, and ultimate, transition in life.

Should I wait until my doctor recommends hospice?

Doctors are trained to save lives, and because of that they have a hard time telling patients that it’s time for hospice. According to Joe Sgro, “Doctors are trained to heal. They don’t want to ‘give up’ either,” which is why it is so important to fight the misconception that hospice is “giving up.” Hospice gives people a sense of dignity, and it gives families meaningful time with their loved ones – time that can make the end of the life transition easier and less traumatic.

“Even as someone who has training in end-of-life spiritual care and knows how deeply effective and positive hospice can be, I had trouble getting a real conversation started with doctors and family when my father-in-law was diagnosed with Stage IV cancer,” says Elisa Cottrell. “I knew the important work we all had to do in saying goodbye. In making sure all those things you want to say to your loved ones get said, but it was a hard sell. In the end, we thought we had a few months left with my father-in-law, but we only had five weeks. He never made it to hospice. I still feel very strongly that my father-in-law’s oncologist robbed us from having meaningful time that could have made the transition easier. There are many long-term complications of grieving that will linger with the family because they didn’t have the chance to properly face the situation. Nobody was able to be at peace with what was happening. They were all fighting it. It made for a lot of extra stress then and now.”

And that’s one of the most important things hospice can do. In addition to walking families through the stages of grief and helping them to understand the process better, Kathy Sgro feels that the most important thing Alterna-Care can do is to get the family and patient to the peace stage. This is the truly revolutionary part of hospice that most can’t understand unless they’ve been through it before.

For more on end of life issues, read our article, Approaching End of Life Issues With Forethought here. And check back next week for our upcoming post, 5 Misconceptions About Hospice.

Threats to Medicaid: Can You Prove It?

Cash payments or informal caregiver arrangements can affect your loved one’s ability to qualify for Medicaid upon going into a nursing home. Here’s what you need to know…

Giving Money to Family Can Jeopardize Medicaid Eligibility

When someone applies for Medicaid, the state looks back 5 years to see if any money was given away to the family. If so, the state imposes a penalty, or a delay of benefits. Sometimes money was clearly given to the family. Other times, it was used for the loved one, but the family can’t prove it. Check out the case below for a specific example.

Michigan Family’s Benefits Delayed – No Proof of Expenses

Betty Jensen was aging and suffering from dementia. She remained in her own home, but started needing more and more assistance to stay there. In May of 2011, her grandson (Jason) acted on her behalf and hired someone to be Ms. Jensen’s caregiver.

When he hired the caregiver, Jason did so informally without a written contract. For nearly a year, Jason paid the caregiver using almost $19,000 worth of Ms. Jensen’s assets. In March of 2012, Ms. Jensen’s dementia progressed to the point where she had to enter a nursing home.

In April of 2012, Jason applied for Medicaid benefits to help offset the cost of his grandmother’s care. While she was found eligible for benefits, the Department of Human Services (DHS) penalized her for “divesting” funds. They classified the payments to the caregiver (along with some other “gifts”) as “divestments.” That meant her Medicaid benefits were delayed for 7 months and 2 days.

Sadly, Ms. Jensen died before Medicaid started covering her nursing home expenses. (In Central Illinois, this delay would have cost Ms. Jensen and/or her family approximately $35,000!)

Her grandson appealed the ruling and lost, because the payments were made to the caregiver without a written agreement that should have been put into place before care began. The case was appealed several more times with varying results, but ultimately the courts sided with DHS, stating that an agreement with a caregiver needs to be written and official.

Caregiver Agreements in Illinois

The above case happened in Michigan, but the same thing could have easily happened in Illinois. The problem with paying cash for caregivers or hiring home help without any documentation is that there is no proof where the money went. Any “gifts” can cause a delay in benefits. And if a family member is taking out large amounts of cash or writing checks without documentation, the caseworkers may assume they are gifts.

Read more about ways elder law attorneys like us can help with in-home care: 9 Ways Elder Law Attorneys Can Help with In-home Care

The Complex World of Medicaid

Medicaid is our country’s largest healthcare benefits program, paying 70% of all nursing home bills in the US. One in six Americans are covered by it. The laws governing Medicaid are some of the most complex and confusing laws in existence. They are often nearly impossible to understand without highly experienced legal assistance. Without proper planning and advice, many people unnecessarily jeopardize their future care, their well-being, and the security of their family.

Medicaid Planning Can Help Even if You’re Already in Nursing Care

Medicaid planning (or what we here like to call Life Care Planning) ideally should be started when you are still able to make sound legal and financial decisions. (Somewhere around the age of 65.) That way you can still have control over what you want and how you want to live.

What many don’t know is that even if you’re already in a nursing home, it’s rarely too late to do planning that can save some of your financial resources. Read our article, “7 Ways an Elder Law Attorney Can Help Even if Your Loved One is in a Nursing Facility

To find out more about avoiding the crushing costs of long-term care, make plans to attend one of our upcoming workshops – Avoid Nursing Home Poverty: 13 Misconceptions About Long-term CareIf, after attending the workshop (where you won’t be pressured at all) you decide to work with us, you’ll receive $200 off your initial meeting fee if you schedule it within 30 days of attending the workshop. Give us a call at 217-726-9200 to sign up for our next workshop.

life care planning

2 Types of Help You May Need

Last week we gave you a secret test you could give a named helper (or potential helper) to see if they might be up to the task. But what sorts of things might you need help with? There are generally two categories…

Help With Finances

A recent National Institutes of Health study showed a decrease in decision-making skills between the ages of 56-85. We also know, statistically, that if you reach the age of 65 you will, on average, live 19.2 more years. Therefore, many of us will need help with complicated financial decisions that occur in the last few decades of life.

A Power of Attorney for finances will allow someone to help you pay bills, manage your investments and make financial decisions. This may sound very scary, but we help our clients make good choices about financial POAs on a daily basis. That’s why you see the word “Counselor” in our name.

Help With Healthcare Decisions

As you age, you may want input from others about your healthcare. We all know how complicated the medical care world is to navigate these days.

A Power of Attorney for healthcare will allow someone to help you make decisions about a variety of medical issues:

• Medical treatments – like chemo and radiation if you’re diagnosed with cancer. Sadly, doctors and nurses can’t always be relied upon to recommend the best course of action. It can be extremely helpful to have someone else listening to the options, the pros and cons, and then helping you make sense of the process.

• Surgery – whether it’s really needed or not.

End of life decisions – do you want to be hooked up to machines? Do you want to spend your last days at home if at all possible?

• Where to  live – should I downsize, stay put (age in place) or is there another alternative?

• How to get the best care – marketers are very savvy and they know that seniors are an easy target. It would be very helpful to have someone who can help you weed through all the “flash” of advertisements and get down to the real useful information so you can make informed choices.

• When to sign a “Do Not Resuscitate” order.

Learn more about what exactly helpers do in our post, “12 Duties of a Helper.”

How Edwards Group Can Help

We help families choose good helpers everyday. This is a difficult decision and one of the most important you’ll ever make. You don’t have to do it alone. We can guide you through the process of deciding who is best. While you’ll only do this once in your lifetime (maybe twice), we’ve helped hundreds of families since 2008. In that time, our firm has been solely dedicated to estate planning and elder law. We’ve seen A LOT and gained a lot of wisdom from the families we help on a daily basis. We can help you know what to do and what NOT to do.

Give us a call at 217-726-9200 and plan to attend an upcoming workshop today. If you attend one of our workshops, you’ll receive $200 off your initial meeting fee (if you schedule your appointment within 30 days of the workshop). We do this so you’ll know, before spending your hard earned money, if we’re the right firm for you. Attending a workshop makes the planning process easier and more effective.

The greatest threat to an effective estate plan is not taking any action at all, so take your first step today and call us at 217-726-9200.

Medicaid Application

6 Reasons You Should Not Do a Medicaid Application On Your Own

While it may seem like a good idea that things like Medicaid applications and Veterans benefit apps are accessible and do-it-yourself, as with many things relating to government, it’s really not that simple.

Here are six reasons you should not do a Medicaid application without the help of an experienced elder law attorney:

 

1. You’ll lose all your hard-earned money.

Typically, when someone goes into a nursing home, the admissions people or case workers at the home tell people, “Spend all your money and then let us know when you’re ready to apply for Medicaid.” The best solution they can offer families is to “spend down” every dime of their hard-earned money on the astronomical price of nursing care! Planning with an experienced elder law attorney oftentimes results in protecting 50% of the life savings so it can be used for later expenses or as a legacy for your family.

2. You’ll go crazy with the stress of the complex and bureaucratic process.

If you’ve been an adult for any amount of time then you know how difficult it can be to deal with government agencies. We have endless stories of families who get caught up in the paperwork, losing money and time with their aging loved ones while they “fight” the process trying to qualify for help. (The picture above is an actual Medicaid application before we sent it off for approval. It’s A LOT of paperwork!)

3. You (or your loved one) will be left with $1 a day to live on.

Without proper Medicaid planning, all your funds will have to be “spent down” in order to allow the Medicaid benefits to begin. This basically means that your family will have to spend their own money if you need something outside of the included costs of the nursing home. Learn more about that when you subscribe to our Medicaid Planning e-course.

4. You may not qualify for benefits because of a simple error.

Again, we have a lot of stories about families who filled something out wrong, didn’t get something in on time or didn’t phrase something just right. We also have stories about the caseworkers themselves making mistakes that disqualified the families. These mistakes are just too costly.

5. Your application will likely be delayed, costing tens of thousands of dollars.

People who apply for benefits on their own can take 6 months (or longer) to jump through all the hoops and qualify so they can start receiving money to pay for care. With the cost of nursing care in Central Illinois, this means families are losing a minimum of $30,000 while they wait to be approved!! On average, we can qualify people for benefits much quicker, in about 2 months. We also have 2.5 team members who are dedicated to this process alone, and they are experts at what they do. (Read about our Benefits Coordinator, Melissa Coulter.)

6. You won’t have anyone to turn to for help.

Filling out a Medicaid app is unlike anything you’ve ever done before and much more difficult than most people imagine. You don’t have to do it alone. Relying on the knowledge and expertise of a trustworthy elder law attorney who has been down this road hundreds of times before is invaluable. We know this because we have people come to us all the time who have tried to do the apps on their own and failed. We absolutely hate to see this. We also hear from grateful clients on a regular basis who are so glad they turned to us for help. (See a testimonial like this below.)

Medicaid Planning is Some of the Best Money You’ll Ever Spend

The cost of an elder law attorney who helps you plan for Medicaid is more than offset by what you save in out-of-pocket nursing home costs. Without an attorney, all of your family’s money will inevitably go to the nursing home. With the help of an elder law attorney, even after legal fees, you’ll be left with more money than if you had done the app on your own. If the money is going to disappear anyway, why not use that money to pay an attorney who will guide your family through the stressful benefits process as quickly as possible, maximizing the money available to pay for care?

With good planning, you are more proactive; therefore you get much better results. (It’s a lot like using an accountant to make sure you don’t pay too many taxes.) Working with an elder law attorney insures that you get the best possible result instead of the worst possible result. And the worst possible result is what most people believe they HAVE TO DO when it comes to paying for nursing care — spend all their money until it’s gone. The best possible result means pursuing all the benefits that are legally available (like taking all the possible tax deductions when working on your taxes), and protecting your hard-earned money so it’s available to you and your family to use later on.

Here’s what one of our clients had to say about the process after it was done:

“I want to thank you again for all your hard work in helping my family. It has meant so much to have someone to answer questions, explain things and especially hold my hand through this amazing journey. I had moments where I wondered, ‘What am I doing spending [so much] of my parent’s money?’ Then I would wonder if we were ever going to get everything transferred, completed and filed. [When] I began to see the light at the end of the tunnel, I knew in my heart we had made the right decision. The professionalism shown by Edwards Group, which includes [Melissa] and Dave, has far exceeded my expectation. On behalf of my family, thank you again for all the phone calls, emails, texts, and especially the support. You have been amazing.”  DC from Glendale, MO

If you’d like to continue learning more about Medicaid Planning and how an experienced elder law attorney can help make the process faster and less stressful, be sure to check out our FREE Medicaid Planning e-course. You’ll receive several emails in succession telling you about the Medicaid application process while also giving you tangible steps you can take to begin the process. If your family is in a nursing home crisis situation, please call us right away at 217-726-9200. Our staff will be happy to assist you and answer your questions.