will

The Difference Between a Will, a Living Will and a Living Trust

A recent survey on estate planning found that 74% of those surveyed thought estate planning was a confusing topic. That’s no surprise considering estate planning has a language all its own. Today, we’ll sort out the difference between a Will, a Living Will and a Living Trust. Three separate estate planning tools with similar names, but different roles to play in your planning.

Last Will & Testament

This is what people commonly refer to as a “Will.” It is the most popular estate planning tool. This legal document is used to determine where assets go and who is in charge (the executor) after you die. Until you die, your Will and your executor do not have any legal authority. Wills often must go through the time and expense of probate court.

Living Will

A Living Will states your end of life wishes, such as when to “pull the plug.” This document reduces stress and confusion for your loved ones. It gives guidance to the person serving as your healthcare power of attorney. This is the person who ultimately decides when to stop treatment and let you go if it becomes necessary.

Living Trust

A Living Trust does a lot of what a Will does, but it does it more efficiently. It is kept private and avoids probate court. A Living Trust also states your wishes after death, but also includes instructions if you become disabled. The Trustee is in charge of the trust. Usually, you are the Trustee while you’re healthy, but then a successor takes over if you become disabled (by a stroke, Alzheimer’s, etc.) or when you pass away. (Read more here about choosing good helpers for your plan.)

Helping educate people and demystify estate planning is one of our highest priorities because effective plans can only be created when clients and attorneys work together. You bring your knowledge of your family and it’s unique circumstances. We bring our knowledge of estate planning and the law. Together we create effective plans that bring peace of mind and protection for those people and things you care about. (Read more about that here.)

To continue learning more about the unique language of estate planning, click here to read “What’s the Difference Between a DNR and a POA?” To learn more about Wills and Trusts, check out the dates for our upcoming workshop, “Wills & Trusts: How to Get Started”.

Introducing: Edwards Group LLC Youtube Channel

Scheduling an initial meeting or attending a workshop can be a great way to learn about the legal tools available to you. But with the hectic nature of everyday life, watching a YouTube video can be a quicker and more efficient way to access basic estate planning information. Edwards Group is launching a YouTube Channel to help you accomplish your estate planning goals, regardless of how busy your everyday life is. Please click on the topics below to learn more from the Edwards Group’s Youtube Channel:

What is a trust?

What types of trusts are available to me? 

How can I find and pay for a good nursing home?

What is an Elder Law Attorney?

 What can I expect during the estate planning process?

What is life-care planning?

Why You Need Long-term Care Planning

One of the most important things an estate planning/elder law attorney can help you accomplish is taking good care of your loved ones as they age. Good elder law attorneys will also help find ways to pay for care. David Edwards, Estate Planning Attorney at Edwards Group LLC, explains how long-term care planning can help you accomplish these goals in the video below:

Scheduling an appointment or attending a workshop will help you learn more about the legal tools available to you. Your initial meeting with Edwards Group will last about 45 minutes. During that time you’ll talk with David to decide if he can be of any help to you and your family. Please contact Tarina at Tarina@EdwardsGroupLL.com to schedule an appointment today.

4 Challenges of Aging Alone

There’s a growing segment of people who are aging without the help of their adult children (either because they don’t have children or because their children live far away). Read on to learn more about the challenges this group faces.

People are living longer than ever before in history. People are having less children. And those children often live out of town or in other states. Because of all these factors, 1 in 4 Americans over the age of 65 are at risk of becoming “elder orphans.”

Many don’t like this term. “I’ve lived just fine on my own nearly all my life!” However, it is a quick and clear way to describe a growing number of people who are getting older without the immediate support of close family. And it is a HUGE challenge – one our firm is seeing more and more often.

4 Challenges of Aging Alone

It used to be that a will was an adequate estate plan for most people, but a will only works after a person’s death. A will cannot help with the challenges that present themselves when a person is in their 70’s and 80’s. And if that person does not have children, or has children halfway across the country, then the challenges of the last two decades of life can make things even harder.

So what are 4 important things to consider if you find yourself in this situation?

1. Who’s gonna be in charge?

Of course, you would like the answer to be yourself, but what happens if you have a stroke, start to experience the signs of dementia or develop cancer? When the time comes (and it will come for the vast majority of people), who will pay your bills for you? Who will help get you to doctor visits or treatments? Who will help you get groceries or cook? Read about choosing good helpers here.

2. Who will even know if you need help?

Oftentimes, we don’t recognize the need for help in our own lives. More often than not, at our firm, it is the adult children who notice that their parents need help. It is nearly impossible to notice a slow decline in your own life without someone else’s perspective.

3. What if you get help from all the wrong places?

Sadly, there are more ways to scam seniors than ever before. Dishonest caregivers have always been able to steal money, change the will, etc. but now there are mail order scams, and tech scams on iPads or via email. It is really hard to know who to trust (read about 7 Types of Helpers to Watch Out For here), which brings us to the next challenge…

4. What if you reject good advice because you don’t know who to trust?

While it is really hard to know who to trust, there are still some really good, honest people out there who are passionate about helping seniors. We work with these types of advisors everyday. They are out there, but if you’re on your own, how will you know if you can trust them?

Aging is not something any of us wants to think about, but by thinking and planning ahead, you can save yourself a lot of grief, stress, dignity and money.

If you are facing the prospect of aging alone and are concerned that you don’t have an adequate plan in place, don’t hesitate to give us a call at 217-726-9200. We are always happy to help in anyway that we can!

Lesson #2 from Robin Williams – Your “Special Stuff” List

Another way (see the first way here) in which you can minimize fighting amongst your family after you’re gone is by creating a “special stuff” list before you go.

Creating a “Special Stuff” List Can Minimize Fighting Amongst Your Family After You’re Gone

Last week, we talked about having “The Conversation” with your kids and how it can really increase the chances that things will go as planned after you’re gone. This week we are really excited to offer you a special resource that will help you decide who should get what special possessions and heirlooms! (Keep reading for the FREE resource.)

Many families fight over the personal property “stuff” as much as they fight over money. (Sometimes even more than they fight over money.) When it comes to preventing a big fight after you die, it’s not enough to deal with the financial items. You must deal with property that has emotional or family value.

Because of this, I encourage clients to create a “special stuff list” that directs certain items to the people they want those items to go to. This list, which is officially called a Memorandum for Distribution of Personal Property, is then incorporated into the Will or Living Trust.

7 Things to Consider When Making Your “Special Stuff” List

1. What did your parents or grandparents pass down to you that you want to pass on?

2. What items bring back the most memories of your family time?

3. Have you discussed with family what they might want? Some families have a “lottery” style selection process where they openly discuss item by item what they may want. Others prepare a “fire inventory” list of their belongings and then send copies to their children, requesting that the children mark the items they want on a scale from 1-10 with 10 being they want that item the most. Once the children return their lists to the parents, the parents can then more adequately assess who will get what.

4. How will you preserve the stories behind the items? Write out the story, record a video or audio clip about it. Even a few short sentences will mean a lot when you’re gone.

5. Don’t rely on Post-it notes, masking tape or just assume, “The kids know who gets what.” This just doesn’t work!

6. Make sure your “special stuff” list or letter is signed and dated, with copies sent to your attorney. Also keep copies with your Will or Living Trust paperwork.

7. In order to better identify items, take photos and include them with your “special stuff” list.

A Few More Things to Consider…

While creating your list, don’t assume the things you find valuable will be the same things your family finds valuable. It’s always better to communicate about what you want to leave, and to whom, beforehand. Maybe you want your granddaughter to have your birthstone earrings, but maybe she’d rather have the old battered, blue pottery bowl that you used to  make pudding in together. You might never know the bowl was meaningful to her without a conversation, and you might even throw it out without any consideration, thinking, “Nobody’ll want this ol’ thing.”

DOWNLOAD Your FREE “Special Stuff” List Worksheet

It’s very difficult to see families torn apart by issues like “who gets Grandma’s yellow pie plate?” Our firm is always seeking ways to make planning easier for you, and we are really excited about our latest resource: Your “Special Stuff” List Worksheet. Set aside an afternoon to spend going through the worksheet line by line, and you should be well on your way to making sure your family will still be speaking to each other after you’re gone.

As always, if you have any questions, please feel free to call us at 217-726-9200. We will be more than happy to help you in any way possible.

A Lesson from Robin Williams: Having “The Conversation”

One way in which you can minimize fighting amongst your family after you’re gone is by having “The Conversation” before you go…

Does Your Family Have Trust Issues Like Robin Williams?

After his death last year, it appeared that Robin Williams did everything right when it came to estate planning. The bulk of his wealth was transferred through well-thought-out (and private) trusts that distributed his belongings to his three children while also providing for his current wife, so she could stay in the house they shared. And yet, his third wife and his three children still got involved in a court case with each other. So what happened? And what can we learn from this situation?

Effective Estate Planning Anticipates Emotions Will Run High

The first thing people should know is that all bets are off when someone dies. In the extremely emotional  environment of grief and loss, even the best families experience some stress and disagreement. It’s just hard to avoid. Every estate planning attorney could fill a book with unbelievable real life stories about this very thing.

Effective estate planning attorneys work hard to mitigate this risk and prevent these issues from tearing families apart. And that’s where “The Conversation” and the “Special Stuff List” come in. Over the next two weeks, we’ll look at two important actions you can take to minimize fighting in your family.

“The Conversation”

Just like the birds and the bees talk you once had with your kids when they were younger, this next conversation can bring up almost as much anxiety. Many times it’s “easier” to start a conversation about inheritance and estate planning during family gatherings or holiday get-togethers. I know. I know. That sounds like a real downer of a conversation for a family event, but let me assure you, it will be a lot less unpleasant than what your family will experience after you’re gone if you DON’T have “The Conversation” with them.

Here are 5 tips for talking about inheritance:

1. Share your own reasons or motives for bringing up the issue. Then try to clearly convey what values are really important to you. What’s important to accomplish with your assets after your death? What does fair mean to you? What does it look like? What items do you think have special meaning? What stories about those items need to be written down and shared with your family?

2. Ask “what if” questions to find out how your family feels about certain scenarios. “What if Mom had to go in a nursing home and I was already gone? Would you want to keep the house? What would you do with the stuff in the house?” Or “what if Mom and I downsized. What would you want us to keep?”

3. Clearly convey choices you’ve already made, like who is in charge of making decisions after you’re gone (or incapacitated). For example, if your will says that the children should share your estate 50/50, then one child may understand that to mean keeping the house and sharing it. The other child may see it as an opportunity to sell the house and get some money. Bam. Now you have a big fight and your children never speak to each other again. (This is a TRUE story.) It is vitally important to talk to your kids about how you want things done before you’re gone (and then make sure to tie it down legally, as well.)

4. Look for natural opportunities to talk about the issue. Sometimes the death of a neighbor or a friend can provide better timing for this conversation. Celebrity deaths like Robin Williams can also present good times to bring up the topic, especially if their estate is presenting problems you would like to avoid.

5. Listen. Remember that listening is an important part of communication and any conversation. Take time to listen to your family’s perspective and opinion throughout the course of “The Conversation.”

Having “The Conversation,” along with detailed and effective legal planning will go a long way in avoiding the problems that Robin Williams’ family is now having. Read more tips on having “The Conversation” here.

In our next blog post we’ll talk about creating your “Special Stuff List.” This special list further clarifies your wishes and intentions with regards to certain special pieces of property. (Like your paperweight collection or the antique shotguns you inherited from your grandfather.)

As always, if you have any questions, please feel free to call us at 217-726-9200. We will be more than happy to help you in any way possible.

non-financial estate planning issues

10 Non-financial Planning Issues You Should Consider

Effective planning doesn’t just involve money…

We tend to do things a little differently around here. After years of doing planning the traditional way (and seeing ways that the process could be improved), I started my own firm. Not only is it important for me to educate you about planning financially, I also want you to think about the non-money planning issues that are often overlooked by more traditional estate planning.

Not planning for non-financial issues can be just as tragic as not planning for more traditional money issues. This lack of planning can lead to poor quality of life for you, extra stress for your kids and loss of a legacy.

Here are 10 non-financial planning issues to consider and their solutions:

1. Healthcare. Who will make your healthcare decisions if you can’t? And will they know when to “pull the plug”? When they do pull the plug, will your organs be donated? Solution: You need to cover the proper legal authority through a healthcare power of attorney and a living will. Also, have conversations with your family about your wishes so they know, without a doubt, how you want them to act on your behalf.

2. Pets. Without a plan, your special dog may be bounced around from relative to relative or even put down because there is nowhere for him to go. Solution: Your will or trust can specify who will care for your pet and how the pet’s expenses will be paid after you are gone. (Which reminds me of one of my favorite estate planning jokes.)

3. Wisdom. What does your family stand for? What values were important to your parents and grandparents? Will your grandkids know about those? Solution: Take the time to reflect on these things and write them down. You can find resources for where to start online, or even hire someone to help you at the Association of Personal Historians.

4. Online or computer stuff. More and more of our lives are being lived online – Facebook, online photos, emails with your grandkids.  How will your family access that info after you’re gone? In this day and age it’s important to have a plan for this. (Read a real life story about it here.) Solution: You can store the information yourself in a safe deposit box, you can use one of the newly formed companies out there (SecureSafe or PasswordBox), or your attorney can keep the information for you.

5. Family heirlooms. Grandma’s old table, the shotgun with the homemade stock, the family Bible that’s over 100 years old. What will you pass on? And will you pass along the story that goes with it? Antique shops are filled with stuff that has some value to a stranger, but could have been priceless to family members, if only the story behind the item had been preserved. Solution: Take the time to clearly communicate your wishes or preserve the stories behind those special items. You can include the history of family items as part of your “special stuff list” or in a separate letter your family will get after you’re gone.

6. Guardians for kids. If people who don’t share your values end up raising your minor children, then the money you leave won’t really matter. Solution: Our free Kids Guardianship Kit is a great resource for knowing how to choose a guardian, and even includes a Child Raising Priorities Checklist to help you through the process.

7. Sibling relationships. If you become disabled and one child is the primary caregiver, will the rest of the family be prepared? Will the caregiver feel like no one else is helping out? Will the other siblings feel like the caregiver is overspending your money? Only you can know the answers to these questions. Solution: As part of our process we will discuss with you how to best choose helpers and how to make sure they know what to do when the time comes. Good planning helps avoid misunderstandings between siblings.

8. Burial wishes. Do you want to be cremated or have a visitation? What will your obituary say? Will you plan it out or leave it to your kids to decide (or fight about) during a time of grief and high stress? Creating a funeral plan or burial plan can be a real gift to your family and make the time of remembering you more meaningful. Solution: In Illinois, you can specify your wishes in your Disposition of Remains document, which provides binding burial instructions.

9. Living arrangements. If you’re near the end of your life, sick and unable to care for yourself, all the money in the world won’t matter if your living arrangements are not what you want for yourself. How important is it that you remain living on your own? Are there certain facilities you absolutely do not want to be placed in? Solution: As part of your disability instructions in your living trust, you can be very specific about how you want to be cared for and where you want to live.

10. End of life issues. Do you want to be kept alive with a feeding tube? Ventilator? Will your family know what your wishes are? If you are 85 years old with terminal cancer, would you want heart surgery just to prolong your life a few weeks or months? Solution: Your living will and healthcare power of attorney give the legal authority and instructions on those issues. But it is also very important to discuss these difficult issues with your family so they understand your preferences.

See our Infographic illustrating these issues HERE.

We are always happy to talk with you about any questions or concerns you might have. Just give us a call at 217-726-9200. And if you want to learn more about the process of planning, feel free to check out our next Intro to Edwards Group workshop. This 1-hour workshop is a great way to learn about our unique process, why it’s so effective and how our pricing works, etc.

bad heir day

A Bad Heir Day: When Beneficiary Designations Trump Your Will

Download our Beneficiary Designations Form Now

Many people incorrectly assume that all their assets will be distributed through their will. Unfortunately, this is a big misconception. A good example of this is retirement savings, such as an IRA or 401(k). These accounts are passed on to the person or persons who were designated on the form when the account was started. Many people don’t give much thought to these forms, especially after they first fill them out, but that can cause huge problems down the road. (Read about how such a mistake cost the adult children of Leonard Smith $400,000.)

Just recently, here at Edwards Group, we had this sort of situation arise as well. A client had an old 401(k) from a previous job in which his parents were named as beneficiaries. Unfortunately, they had passed away so the 401(k) had no beneficiaries listed. When the client died, we had to go through the expensive process of probate court to get the 401(k) into the hands of the right people.

Improper beneficiary designations can also jeopardize nursing home care if Medicaid is paying for that care. Recently we had a case where the spouse of someone in nursing care died leaving money to the disabled spouse instead of their adult children. This large amount of money is now jeopardizing the surviving spouse’s benefits.

I cannot emphasize enough how important these beneficiary designations are! It is not enough to just fill out the form once and then leave them be. It is vitally important that you check these designations yearly as a part of the regular upkeep of your plan. (Download our Beneficiary Designations form here.)

So, what types of assets with beneficiary designations trump a Will?

  • Life insurance polices
  • Annuities
  • Retirement accounts such as 401 (k)s and IRAs
  • Bank accounts with a payable on death provision
  • Investment accounts with a transfer on death provision

And what kind of life changes should trigger a review of beneficiary designations? After the following life changes, you need to double check who you put on your beneficiary designation forms:

  • Marriage
  • Divorce
  • Births
  • Deaths
  • Job changes, including retirement
  • Long-term care needs of one spouse
  • Disability of a child or grandchild

Now, here’s what to do to make sure this doesn’t make a mess for you or your family:

Make a list of all retirement accounts, life insurance policies, annuities and investment accounts. To the right of those specific assets, write who the beneficiary is and the date you last designated them. Review this list once a year (like on April 15). Or join the Dynasty program where we help you keep up with all of this. We’ve also included a PDF you can download to help make the process easier.

This whole issue highlights why Laura and Liis are so important to the clients at Edwards Group. Many of you may wonder why we need two Asset Coordinators, but it is a big job and it is a critically important job. One of the biggest mistakes people (and even other attorneys) make is not properly handling assets within an estate plan. You cannot have an effective plan if the assets have not been properly titled, designated and coordinated.

As always, if you have any questions about beneficiary designations or any other estate planning or elder law issues, please call us at 217-726-9200. We will be happy to speak with you and answer any questions we can.

How to Avoid an Estate Battle After You’re Gone

Creating a “special stuff list” will go a long way in keeping the peace once you’re gone.

Sadly, in my line of work, I see families fighting much more often than I would like. And while the media might lead you to believe it’s all about the money, oftentimes the fights are about things like Grandma’s curio cabinet full of keepsakes.

When it comes to preventing a big fight after you die, a will just isn’t enough. Even with an effective will, there is plenty of room for disagreement and fighting. Because of this, I encourage clients to create a “special stuff list” that directs certain items to the people they want those items to go to. This list, which is officially called a Memorandum for Distribution of Personal Property, is then incorporated into the Will or Living Trust.

 

Here are 7 things to consider when making your “special stuff list”:

1. What did your parents or grandparents pass down to you that you want to pass on?

2. What items bring back the most memories of your family time?
3. Have you discussed with family what items they might want?
4. How will you preserve the stories behind the items? Write out the story and record a video or audio about it. Even a few short sentences will mean a lot.
5. Don’t rely on Post-it notes, masking tape or just assume, “the kids know who gets what.”
6. Create a special stuff list and make sure it is signed, dated, and copies sent to your attorney and also kept with your Will or Living Trust.
7. In order to better identify items, take photos and include it with your “special stuff list.”
We’ve created a great resource to help you create your “special stuff” list. Download the worksheet by clicking on the button below.

Download Your FREE Resource

A Few More Things to Consider

While creating your list, don’t assume the things you find valuable will be the same things your family finds valuable. It’s always better to communicate about what you want to leave, and to whom, beforehand. Maybe you want your granddaughter to have your birthstone earrings, but maybe she’d rather have that old battered, blue pottery bowl that you used to make pudding in when she visited. You might never know the bowl was meaningful to her without a conversation, and you might even throw it out without any consideration, thinking, “Nobody’ll want this ol’ thing.”

A good resource on the matter is Who Gets Grandma’s Pie Plate, a resource developed by University of Minnesota professor, Marlene Stum. On her website, Stum gives tips about broaching the awkward topic of inheritance. Read Critical Conversations About Inheritance: Can We Talk? here for more. This article, from Consumer Reports, also has some good tips.

will

8 Costly Myths About Wills

There are a lot of misconceptions surrounding wills. These wrong assumptions cost families time, money and stress on a regular basis. Here are eight costly myths to be aware of:

1. Wills avoid probate. False! In fact, wills are designed to go through probate. A will states your wishes, but your executor may need a court order to be able to take action. Going through probate court will always add delay and expense. Most probates last at least a year or more. A living trust is often the best solution to this problem.

2. Your will and your assets remain private. Wills are public documents, which is how we all know that 20% of Michael Jackson’s estate went to charity. However, we don’t know which charities, because Jackson had a trust set up, and trusts remain private.

3. A will prevents fighting over assets. This could not be further from the truth! Wills are the most contested legal document in our courts. And just because you request something in your will, does not mean it will be carried out. Many estates have been drained of all their money because of long legal battles over wills.

4. A will helps you avoid taxes. A will does nothing but help distribute your property. If you are concerned about the complicated taxes surrounding death, estates and what you leave behind, it’s best to consult with an experienced estate planning attorney who will do more than simply fill in the blanks of a simple will for you.

5. Estranged family members do not need to be notified of probate if the will excludes them from inheritance. In Illinois, your next of kin must be notified as part of the probate process, even if they are not getting anything under your will. In fact, when they are notified they are reminded of their right to challenge the will and told the deadline for filing their challenge. Plus, they are given a sample of the form to use!

6. A will from one state is not legal in another. This myth is not true — your will should be valid in another state, if it was valid when it was signed. However, each state’s laws are different and those different laws could impact how well your will works. For instance, there may be different real estate laws or differences in how each spouse has rights to the other’s assets. Therefore, it is best to consult with an experienced estate planning attorney in your new state, rather than leaving things to chance with your old will.

7. A will helps when you become physically or mentally incapacitated. A will does nothing until death. It is a death document. When you become physically or mentally incapacitated, you need powers of attorney or healthcare directives. A trust is the tool that can provide more planning opportunities and the ability to be more detailed about your wishes during disability.

8. The cost of your estate plan is only the cost of drawing up the documents. Many people focus on the costs now, but ignore the costs later. But you should consider all of the costs. A simple will now may result in more costs later. An effective plan now, possibly including a living trust, may cost more now but will save expenses later and make it easier on your family. It’s a dirty little secret that over the years many estate attorneys make the bulk of their money after death – once the client is gone and they have to fix what they didn’t do right to begin with! A good estate plan will anticipate any unique issues your situation presents, and put protections in place to make sure it’s smooth sailing for your family after you’re gone. (At least where your assets are concerned.)

Despite the many online options these days, it is still best to consult with an experienced attorney when it comes to estate planning. The experience they bring to the planning process along with your intimate knowledge of the details of your family will create the most effective plan. If you’d like to learn more about the basics of estate planning, check out one of our upcoming workshops, Wills & Trusts: How to Get Started. Just call 217-726-9200 to reserve a spot!

power of attorney

Power Of Attorney FAQ’s

Elisa (who handles all of our communications like newsletters, mail outs and web content) was on the playground the other day talking to some moms after school. They know what she does, so through the course of the conversation powers of attorney came up. (We’ve talked about them previously here and here.) Some good questions were raised, so today we wanted to address some of those questions:

Won’t my spouse automatically be able to make medical decisions if I’m in an accident?

No. Just because you’re married doesn’t mean your spouse has all the rights to deal with your care and medical choices. In emergency situations, a spouse might be able to act, but any ongoing medical situation will require more legal authority. That authority either needs to be through a power of attorney or else a court guardianship order. And that HIPAA medical release you may have signed at the doctor’s office will not allow you to make decisions, even if it allows you to get information. What you need is a healthcare power of attorney that allows you to BOTH get information AND make decisions for your spouse.

Can’t my spouse manage our finances without a power of attorney?

Not necessarily. A spouse can access joint bank accounts, but other types of assets may be a problem. For example, if a car is in your spouse’s name, you would not be able to transfer it if the spouse is disabled. What if you need to sell your house? Even though the house is jointly owned you will need BOTH spouses’ signatures on the deed to sell it. What if the spouse can’t sign? That’s when a power of attorney will allow you to sign for your spouse.

Why do I need a power of attorney for my college age child?

Once a child turns 18 and goes away to college, you can no longer make decisions for him or her. So what types of issues might arise that would require you have a POA for them to act on their behalf?

  • Illness or accidents: again, if your child is over the age of 18 and is in an accident, just because you’re their parent does not entitle you to find out what’s happening medically. Imagine your child needs emergency surgery and is 8 hours from home. The doctors are not required, and in fact are prohibited, from speaking with you without your child’s approval.
  • After a tragic accident, as the parent, you would not be able to help pay bills or deal with your child’s bank accounts without some legal authority like a power of attorney.

Does an attorney have to draft the POA?

No, an attorney is not legally required to do the form. And the forms are available other places. But if you work with us, we provide advice about HOW to fill out the form. We deal with these issues every single day. It’s ALL we do. Because of that, we think about all sides of an issue, what potential pitfalls might be and guide you through what’s best for your unique situation – that’s why I’m sometimes called a “Counselor-at-law.” I give valuable counsel that can prevent heartache and wasted money.

Can’t the person I named as executor in my will just do it?

No! An executor has NO authority to act on your behalf before your death. Just because they have been named as someone to make decisions AFTER your death does not mean that hospitals, doctors, banks and/or the courts will recognize them as such while you are still living. Your death changes the authority that people can use. Before you die, it’s the power of attorney. After you die, it’s the executor.

As always, we’re just a phone call away. If, after reading about POAs, you’ve decided it’s time to do something about this important issue, give us a call. Tarina will talk with you about the specifics of your situation and what the best next step might be. Give us a call at 217-726-9200.